Third Lesson in Leadership: Transparency

The expectation of a superior level of transparency between people who deal with one another, professionally speaking or not, has been fostered by the evolution of social media.

What exactly does transparency mean? Swirling in a storm of information shaped in different ways: e-mails, text messages, YouTube videos, memos, instant messages, and more, it has become so easy for us to dodge one another. In an effort to save time, energy and resources, we have taken a step back from authentically communicating with our teams. This face time is vital to not only creating the key bonds and trust among one another, but also for establishing yourself as a transparent leader.

Nowadays, if the leader plays a clear and transparent role, it will be easier to solve problems faster, develop authentic relationships, and in turn create a deeper sense of trust company-wide. When your employees trust you and feel that they have an important role in what your company is trying to accomplish, they are far more likely to perform at their best and promote a positive work environment with other employees. Instead of worry about the confidential information given to a new employer or an unpaid college intern, the boss of a company must define what information is needed by every colleague or employee. Being clear about that helps to draw the line where starts and finishes each person’s sphere.

As a key component of trust, transparency is an essential element of a great leadership. If you’re thinking about a powerful way to encourage more transparency in your organization this year, consider a group drumming event to kick things off, unite, uplift and inspire your team. It just may be the face time your team was looking for.